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Extreme Weather Community Resilience Project

The RRI Extreme Weather Community Resilience Project is a non-partisan source of information on the emergence of changing climate in the U.S. and internationally. We focus on the experiences of communities in the U.S. that are adapting to the increasing frequency of extreme weather. Where relevant, we explore weather and climate impacts in other nations to help clarify how the warming atmosphere may change physical, economic, political and cultural aspects of our world.

We are entering centuries of transition to new patterns of weather and climate that will be constantly evolving in different locations and over time. Some of those changes will create impacts that may be regionally or nationally unique. But we live in a world of interlocked economies, unstable nations, and population migrations. However remote they may appear, climate and weather disruptions in distant places can ripple outward to challenge the political and economic lives, and the security of communities in the U.S. and other nations.

Mitigation and adaptation to changes in both weather and climate have always been part of the human experience. Choosing not to adapt has never been an option. Our challenges during this future of uncertain weather and climate are solvable. Information about the experiences of others can help us set priorities and act more effectively to sustain the vibrant culture and economy of our nation.

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: THE SYRIAN EXPERIENCE FROM 2006 THROUGH 2016 ILLUSTRATES HOW CHANGING CLIMATE CAN WORSEN THE EXTREMES OF WEATHER AND UNDERMINE CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.
PDF / 852KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: In 2006 Weather and Climate Triggered Agricultural Collapse in Syria that Cascaded Outward to Challenge Cohesion of the European Union.
PDF / 1.17MB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Adapting to Drought is More Complicated Than it Looks.
PDF / 823KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: The Pace of Extreme Weather over the Last Decade Appears Faster. Is it Natural Variability, Climate Disruption…Or Both? PDF / 850KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: “You Don't Want To Meet Someone for the First Time While You're Standing Around in the Rubble." PDF / 827KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Collapse of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica: A Wake-Up Call for U.S. PDF / 567KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: 2012 Drove Home the Vulnerability of Our Nation to Extreme Weather Events PDF / 989KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Multi-Purpose Climate Tool for Communities—One-Stop Planning for Land Use and 21st Century Weather Hazards
PDF / 630KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Reaching Agreement on Minimizing Damage by Extreme Weather is Easier if We Plan for Uncertainty PDF / 796KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Adaptation to Extreme Weather Requires the Capacity to Act PDF / 659KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Climate Disruption is Erratically Degrading Our Existing Weather PDF / 693KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Nation’s Corn Crop Hammered. Crop Insurance Under Scrutiny. PDF / 719KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: What Connects an Ear of Corn, a Cow and a River Barge? It May be Playing in Your Hometown. PDF / 637KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Evidence Grows—Extreme Weather More Frequent and Intense PDF / 688KB

Explore Climate Resilience Project Field Notes: Better Than Before—Greensburg Rising PDF / 570KB

NEWS

Field Notes: The Syrian Experience From 2006 Through 2016 Illustrates How Changing Climate Can Worsen the Extremes of Weather and Undermine Critical Infrastructure

The disruption of America’s critical infrastructures due to climate-amplified extreme weather damage or rising sea levels could be among the earliest climate change shocks we experience.

View PDF.

Field Notes: Adapting to Drought is More Complicated Than it Looks.

Deep into its fourth year of statewide drought, California’s evolving actions to reduce urban water use illustrate the challenges.

View PDF.









     
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